Welcoming D

We got the call for another placement Tuesday. A newly 2 year old boy needed to move foster homes, and we made the easy decision to take him in. I was able to talk to his former foster parents (who had D for 6 months) quite a bit on Wednesday and am truly blessed to have heard their advice, stories, and prayers for little D. What an encouragement that transition ended up being for all of us! Wednesday evening, D came home to us for the first time.

Now, when I say “came home” some of you probably get nervous. You probably think I should be careful, I shouldn’t get too attached, that anything could happen, etc. The truth is that, for me, doing the best job I can do, in the time with D that I have been given, means sacrificing. What may be pain down the road is joy-filled, life-giving love now and that will always be worth it. This is our D. This is his home. We love him dearly.

I’m a little overwhelmed (but not at all surprised by… we ALL knew this was coming) what I feel for him already. He is funny and kind, laid-back and full of adventure. He has wrapped himself around our hearts in some really big ways – YES, even Dave’s heart! 🙂 We are trusting The Lord to hold on to all 3 of us. We know that his great big plan for Dave, me, and D is awesome, regardless of how long we are together.

We are expected to have him for 6 months, but our case manager hinted that it could be longer. And after 2 1/2 days of absolute joy and the best sort of overwhelming exhaustion, I can honestly say 6 months doesn’t seem nearly long enough.

We love you already, little D! Welcome home!

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Popsicle Stick Dolls

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I saw this on Pinterest and literally gasped. It’s the cutest, right? So I decided to make some of my own. This is what you’ll need to make your own set of sweet little popsicle stick gals. 20130220-123956.jpg

 

 

 

1- A glasses case. Mine was $0.50 from the thrift store and in pretty bad shape, so I gave it a quick coat of paint and made a stripe across the top with some washi tape.

2- washi tape

3 – popsicle sticks

4 – colored pencils and a pen

And here’s how you make them!

  1. Paint one side of your popsicle sticks (pictured above)
  2. wrap one end of the stick in washi tape, leaving a small piece untaped (for the head)

20130220-124012.jpg   3. Use your pen and draw a little lady. Don’t be intimidated! It’s really just a few simple lines. Look closely at the picture below if you’re scared of drawing a lady and just copy it, line by line. Drawing isn’t too scary. I promise!20130220-124019.jpg

 

 

4. Color her in with your colored pencils. I tried using markers here, but they bled too much. I colored the tights and the hair on my gals and left their skin the color of the popsicle stick.20130220-124115.jpg

I wanted a place to keep mine so I could keep them in my purse so they’d all stay together and be easily transportable. A glasses case was the perfect place. Now my silly little gals have a home.

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Porter Flea Recap

Porter Flea Buffalo Mae

Porter Flea

 

Porter Flea was just perfect. Seriously the best. It exceeded all my expectations. Watching people get excited about the clothes that I love dearly was really fun. Talking to the customers, meeting the kids who will wear Buffalo Mae, and feeling so so supported by friends – huge. Though I was insanely exhausted at the end of the day, I was feeling quite blessed and content.

Buffalo Mae kids

Nashville vintage kids

We were swamped ALL day. There were only a few moments throughout the day when we didn’t have a bunch of people in our booth looking around and shopping. In those moments, I was able to take a deep breath and take it all in… process, ya know? But I ran about 12 hours on hard-core adrenaline. I’m beyond thankful that I had help. My sister, Christina was in town and she helped me get ready all week, tagging items and such. Dave helped build pieces for display and hung out all day making sure everything was as smooth as possible for me (my hero) and Lillian, apart from taking all these awesome pictures, was my cash register gal and general helpfulness lady.

Christina Herzog and Stephanie Hagen

The highlight of my day was definitely meeting Mike, from American Pickers, and selling him a dress for his sweet daughter Charlie. I meet a decent amount of famous people… I live in Nashville and see celebrities fairly often. I keep cool. I am a normal human about it. But I totally fan-girled when he walked into the booth. I was the biggest dork. I asked to take a photo with him, told him I was a big fan, told him he could have anything he wanted for free (which he did not take advantage of – he paid full price) but, as my friend Carly said, “he’s the Justin Bieber of vintage,” so it was a warranted freak out.

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I’m already looking forward to the next market! I think I could get used to this.

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Tea Party

Birthdays are a big deal to me. When it is my birthday, I drag it out as long as possible. I make a fuss. Do you know what’s really fun for people like me? Making a fuss for others people’s birthdays!

My sweet friend, Sadie, turned 8 years old last month and we threw her a fancy, backyard, magical tea party. Complete with handmade and vintage decor, fancy party dresses, and fresh flowers.

I have a huge stash of vintage hardback books. I added a little chalkboard paint to the covers and now they’re a great, super versatile decoration.

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Happy birthday Sadie Jane! I cannot believe you are 8!

This is Why I Call Myself a Human Mad-Lib

Let me preface this post by saying I DO work some days. But those days are scheduled in advance and vary by the week. But in this weird in-between work and fostering period of my life, this is what a totally normal not-planned-in-advance weekday looks like:

8am: Decide I definitely do not feel like I’m ready for my day. Not getting up yet. Going back to sleep. Except I’m playing on my phone because I can’t actually fall back to sleep. Think about nothing.

9am: Done checking email, Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter on my phone in bed. Guess I should get up. Get on laptop to work. Start designing, blogging, Etsying. Think about very little.

10am: Feel hungry and realize I haven’t eaten breakfast. Text Lillian to see what her family is doing for lunch. Invite myself along.

11am: More computer work. Start to daydream about leaving the house. I feel I’ve been alone far too long and wish Dave was home. Text Dave to tell him hello and send him a picture of myself making a funny face.

Noon: Lunch with Lillian and kids.

1pm-3pm: Errands with Lillian and kids. Whole Foods, Essex, Thriftsmart, CSA pick up. Hear that Muppet song I love and sing it during all errands.

4pm: Say I’m going home to take a nap. Really want to take a nap, but lay down in the living room and think about how little sleep I will get when there are foster kids here instead. Feel nervous. Feel inadequate. Feel excited. Feel adequate. Feel really excited. Think of crafts to do with kids. Think of crafts to do for myself. Remember how messy the craft closet is.

4:30pm: Get up and decide to reorganize entire house, paint furniture, do laundry, and make Dave a present – just for fun. Sing that Muppet song I love really loudly to myself.

5:30pm: Lose steam after only reorganizing the DVD drawer. Text Dave to see if he’ll be home for dinner and send him a picture of the DVD drawer with 7 exclamation points.

6pm: Start to think about cooking dinner and check fridge multiple times. Text Lillian and Amanda to see what they’re doing for dinner. Invite myself along. Tell Twitter about the DVD drawer.

6:15pm: Answer Dave’s phone call for a conversation neither of us can hear because his windows are down in the truck. Get annoyed. Tell him I’ll text him when we know where we’re eating. Walk to the neighbors house to hitch a ride to dinner.

6:30pm: Finally leave for dinner.

6:45pm: Actually decide where we’re going to eat after 15 minutes of aimless driving. Sing that Muppet song quietly.

7pm: Meet Dave at restaurant. Probably Mexican. See a cute baby at dinner. Wish I had a baby. Laugh at Dave’s work stories even though I don’t understand half of them.

8pm: Come home and show Dave how awesome the DVD drawer looks. Feel surprised that he’s not freaking out about it. Reorganize the foster-care room for the 100th time while humming that Muppet song. Dave unwinds in front of the TV.

9pm: Tell Dave I need his help for just like one second- moving some furniture, measuring something for a project I thought up, or hooking up the printer. Get confused when he is too tired to help. He helps anyway. Feel guilty. But also thankful. Decide to watch TV with him before bed because he deserves some downtime. Play on my phone and keep interrupting because I don’t like this show.

10pm: Dave zombie-walks to the bed. I tell him stories about my day and ask him about his while he tries to sleep. Alternate songs to hum- not just Muppets. Dave falls asleep in 10 seconds and I get up to watch an episode of something on Netflix.

11pm: Alright fine, another episode.

12pm: Another.

1am: Go to bed. Not tired.

1:15am: Make a grocery list. Make a project list. Read the Bible. Check Facebook. Remember what I forgot at the store. Wish I could wake Dave up and tell him a funny thing I thought of. Design a baby shower for a friend. Look at motorcycles on Craigslist. Feel sad I can’t get Dave a surprise motorcycle. Feel thankful that Dave doesn’t have a motorcycle – they’re very dangerous. Remember we need to get health insurance. Wish I was pregnant. Sing the Muppet song in my head.

2am: Why is no one still posting things on Instagram? Write a blog post. Remember what else I forgot at the store. Decide what to wear tomorrow. Remember I haven’t done laundry in a week. Feel guilty. Feel silly for feeling guilty about laundry in light of world orphan crisis. Feel hungry. Ignore it. Decide to take more walks. Think about how much I love air conditioning. Think about how the heat doesn’t bother me so much in Haiti. Think about Haiti. Think about adoption. Think about foster care. Make a foster care shopping list. Get nervous. Get excited. Get tired. Pray.

3am: Sleep

4am: Wake up – no blankets

5am: Wake up – too many blankets

8am: I definitely do not feel like I’m ready for my day. Not getting up yet. Playing on my phone because I can’t fall back to sleep.